Monthly Archives: December, 2014

State of the Humanities (Quarter 2, 2014)

Hello Team Humanities!

As many of you know, at the end of every quarter Team Humanities takes a step-back to see how we have progressed in relation to our goals, and what we will need to do next in order to move further, faster, and with a greater orientation towards our teachers and students. Ultimately, all of this is in service of seeing how far we have gotten towards our Humanities vision: 

We believe that the Humanities are critical contents in the actualization of Social Justice and Equity in students’ lives. We thus move students towards Humanities Achievement, Leadership, Critical Consciousness, and Cultural Competence.

As such, we act with the knowledge that every Humanities classroom must aggressively pursue the dismantling of systems of oppression through the provision of rigorous Humanities content and Culturally Responsive Teaching.

As we wrap up our first semester, I thought it would be important for me to share with you all the data we have collected, and the NEW priorities we are forming for Quarter 3 as a result of our feedback and interpretations. For the sake of brevity and focus on what matters most, I have narrowed this data down to the information that is most directly relevant to students in our classrooms.

As you read over this, I would love for you to consider:

  1. Where do my classroom and my students stand in relation to this data?
  2. How can I act within the Humanities Team to improve our collective data?
  3. What experiences, thoughts, support, resources, or feedback can you share to help us interpret or take action in relation to the data we are seeing?
  4. What changes can we make, as a collective, to impact this data for the betterment of our students?

As always, feel free to comment below, or email/text/call Jacob with any questions, ideas, or feedback!

Wait, first, where does this data come from?

We end up collecting A LOT of information in order to make informed decisions with regards to what our next quarter should look like. That information comes from all of the following sources:

  • Student achievement data from your classrooms, which you share with us.
  • Your First Eight Weeks Survey responses
  • Data collected through classroom observations (Engagement with Rigorous Content, and Culture of Achievement) both from me and your TLD Coach
  • Your responses on Professional Development Exit Forms
  • Your responses to other surveys (such as the ones I send out at the end of every quarter)
  • Humanities Leader and TLD Coach feedback on other surveys
  • Anecdotal and qualitative evidence (student work that has been shared, other stories and celebrations emerging from classrooms)
  • Much more!

Data Point #1: Progress Known

  • What is Progress Known (PK) ? PK is basically a “Yes” or “No” answer to the question: “do we have reliable and complete data on where students stand in this classroom?”
  • How do you collect reliable and complete data? The reliable and complete data comes from you teachers sharing it with your TLD Coach and/or Content Specialist. As long as you have data for student progress on ALL your Metrics (and are not, for instance, missing DBQ Data even if you have Mastery Data), and you have shared a reliable assessment with us, then your students are PK!
Progress Known? Social Studies The Arts World Languages All Humanities
YES 67% 60% 71% 66%
NO 33% 40% 29% 34%
Progress Known by Humanities Content as of November 20th, 2014

Progress Known by Humanities Content as of November 20th, 2014

Data Point #2: Culture of Achievement

  • What is Culture of Achievement (CoA)? CoA is the quality of the classroom culture that your students enjoy as they are learning. Some people think immediately about “management” but this goes well beyond that: it’s the way in which your students actively maintain and foster a positive environment because of the way they care about their learning.
  • How do you collect data around CoA? CoA is determined by the TLD Coach in collaboration with your thinking after an observation, using the Culture of Achievement Pathways rubric to inform our terminology. This then gets collected in our Program Tracker so we can analyze the data at different levels.
Culture of Achievement Social Studies The Arts World Languages All Humanities
Destructive 0% 14% 7% 8%
Apathetic or unruly 33% 29% 21% 28%
Compliant and on-task 58% 21% 57% 45%
Interested/ hard-working 8% 36% 14% 20%

Culture of Achievement by Humanities Content as of November 20th, 2014

Data Point #3: Engagement with Rigorous Content

  • What is Engagement with Rigorous Content (ERC)? ERC is the level of rigor at which students are engaging with the content. Some people think immediately about “difficulty” of the questions being asked by the teacher, but this goes well beyond that: it’s the depth and sophistication with which students are thinking about and working within the content.
  • How do you collect data around ERC? ERC is determined by the TLD Coach in collaboration with your thinking after an observation, using the Engagement with Rigorous Content rubric to inform our terminology. This then gets collected in our Program Tracker so we can analyze the data at different levels.
Engagement with Rigorous Content Social Studies The Arts World Languages All Humanities
Not challenged; no learning 0% 14% 14% 10%
Passive or confused re: new content 25% 21% 7% 18%
Factual recall/procedural 42% 36% 71% 50%
Analysis/application/explaining 25% 29% 7% 20%
Evaluation/synthesis/creation 8% 0% 0% 3%
Rigor

Engagement with Rigorous Content by Humanities Content as of November 20th, 2014

Okay, so what next?

Well, A LOT IS COMING UP NEXT! Given a realistic look at the above data (and much more, including your suggestions), we have come up with the following priorities for us to look forward to. Again, take the time to consider: how are you and your students doing in relation to these priorities? What do you need to accomplish in order to push more towards them?

For more detail on the data presented here, our priorities, and what is coming next in the Humanities, check out our Quarter 3 Priorities at this link.

Priority 1:
  • Students are engaged in the content because it is rigorous, compelling, and focused around essential questions that bring to light social justice issues.
  • …Because teachers are planning units and lessons that have strong visions of mastery, and that are propelled by essential questions and meaningful texts.
Priority 2:
  • Students are “on the hook” for their learning because they are collectively, collaboratively, and fully owning the outcomes of the lesson.
  • … Because teachers are ensuring students are being given ownership of their own learning by facilitating strong collaborative structures around rigorous content.
Priority 3:
  • Students are Invested in their Humanities-content goals because they see their success as critical to their future leadership, and because they are aware of their progress.
  • …Because teachers are invested in their end-of-year goals and what they represent for students, and thus measuring and sharing progress towards goals with students and stakeholders.
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Summatives in the Humanities

Capture

Click on the image above to hear Claire Wandro’s students talk about why the Regents Summative Assessment mattered to them!

Check out the quick video above of some of Claire Wandro’s students reflecting on why the Regents final assessment matters to them.

As the frost starts to harden over our Mississippi fields, and plans start to emerge for the winter break, it’s yet again time to start thinking WAY ahead so that it doesn’t rush up on us: it’s time to start thinking about Summatives in the Humanities!

All DRAFTS of Humanities Summatives (unless they are directly the SATP2 or the Regents) need to be submitted to Jacob and your TLD Coach by January 2nd!

To help you with this, this blog post contains:

  1. Why summatives? Why now?
  2. Requirements for your Summatives (with links and resources!)
  3. Links to Teacher-Made Summatives
  4. FAQ and Other Guidelines
  5. Need Additional Support?

Why Summatives? Why Now?

  • Students deserve to reliably know where they stand at the end of the year: After a year of work and growth in your classroom, students deserve to know where they stand compared to their peers across the nation. Summatives are the most reliable way of comparing how our students are doing in relation to other students within TFA, or against a national bar for rigor. Communicating this progress to our students helps them celebrate, reflect on their work this year, and grow as life-long learners.
  • Summatives help YOU plan: Having a summative at this point in the year helps you get concrete on what your students still need to learn, believe, and be able to do between now and the day you administer it. You shouldn’t be teaching to the test: instead, you should be teaching beyond it. A summative will help you clarify the basics of what your students need, and help you develop plans to teach beyond those basics.
  • Summatives are different from normal tests and quizzes: Unlike tests and quizzes, summatives often contain information that students may not have seen before (think about how the AP or the ACT or the SAT work… they test you on a national bar for how you use skills and solve problems rather than for what you already know). This is a chance for students to show their resilience and confidence in potentially unknown territory. And that’s EXCITING, not defeating.
  • Summatives help us advocate for the Humanities: Once we have the data and we can compare it to national standards, often we can apply for grants, advocate for more funding and attention in our schools, etc. Being able to have reliable proof of our students’ progress is the best way to do this.
  • Sometimes we need to give summatives early: due to testing, test-prep, etc. we often don’t have the opportunity to prepare our students for summatives and administer them part-way through the second semester. Having them handy gives us the chance to be flexible with this schedule, and still guarantee our students the right to know where they stand.
  • Summatives take time, feedback, and sharing: Besides all of the above, your summatives need to be vetted by me and your TLD Coach before they are valid, and the whole process is more enjoyable if we have an environment of sharing and collaboration! If we get that going, it will just be simpler in future years when people can pull summatives straight from a resource bank!

Requirements for your Summatives.

  • What should a summative look like?
    • For the most part, a summative assessment should look like a “traditional” assessment, plus any performance tasks or additional projects that would better help you measure your students’ progress towards your holistic vision.
    • It should be a final assessment, so it should be cumulative and cover the information, skills, and progress towards vision you should have mastered this year.
    • It should usually be given in the final weeks of school. However, you should check with your administrator, since often this is not the best time for Humanities classes that become test-prep part way through the second semester.
    • It should be subdivided by standard and/or skill, should be easily trackable by those skills, and should have rubrics or student responses for any open-response questions.
  • What is my summative assessment?
    • This differs a little, depending on your specific content. Any additional performance tasks are welcome, but optional. In the table below, you will see the basic requirements.
    • PLEASE NOTE: None of what is contained in the grid below is optional! In order to have valid measurements of how your students progressed (and to be in good standing with TFA), you MUST execute these full criteria.
    • Click on the links in this table to get access to the rubrics and assessments you need!
Content Level Assessment Type Additional Academic Prompt
Art Lower Elementary A Regents-aligned  assessment pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD Artwork assessed according to the ECE Rubric
Upper Elementary A Regents-aligned  assessment pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD Artwork assessed according to the Mississippi Art Creation Rubric
Secondary A Regents-aligned  assessment (or the Regents itself!) pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD Artwork assessed according to the Mississippi Art Creation Rubric
Music & Dance Elementary A Regents-aligned assessment (Dance, Music) pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD Performance assessed according to the Dance or Music Performance Rubrics
Secondary A Regents-aligned assessment (Dance, Music) (or the Regents itself!) pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD Performance assessed according to the Dance or Music Performance Rubrics
World Languages Elementary A Regents-aligned  (Spanish, French) assessment that covers:

–          Reading

–          Writing

–          Speaking

–          Listening

–          Culture

This should be age-appropriate and pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD.

N/A
Level 1 The Regents Second Language Proficiency Exam (Spanish, French) N/A
Level 2 EITHER:

–          The Regents 1.5 that we designed for you (Spanish, French)

OR:

–          A blind assessment on the Regents Second Language Proficiency (PLEASE EMAIL JACOB IMMEDIATELY IF THIS IS YOUR PREFERENCE!!!)

N/A
Social Studies 5th Grade Social Studies EITHER:

–          A self-created Regents-aligned assessment pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD/

 

OR:

–          The 5th Grade Regents assessment

A DBQ pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD (preferably directly from the aligned Regents exam)
8th Grade Social Studies EITHER:

–          A self-created Regents-aligned assessment pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD.

 

OR:

–          The 8th Grade Regents assessment

A DBQ pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD (preferably directly from the aligned Regents exam)
US History The MS State Assessment

 

(OPTIONAL ADDITION: The Regents US History assessment)

A DBQ pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD (preferably directly from the aligned Regents exam)
All other Social Studies A self-created Regents-aligned assessment pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD. A DBQ pre-approved by Jacob and your MTLD (aligned to the Regents assessment that closest fits your grade-level)

 

Links to Teacher Made Summatives

Check out some of the summatives that teachers have administered in the past!

Featured at the above link are:

  • MUSIC: Alice Hasen’s General Music Summative and Project
  • DANCE: Kasey Wooten’s Dance Summative and Project
  • SOCIAL STUDIES: Patrick Newton’s Summatives, as well as many others!
  • WORLD LANGUAGES:

FAQ and Other Guidelines

Check out this Humanities Summative FAQs for further guidelines, answers, and resources!

Need Additional Support?

  1. Sign up for “Knowing Where You Are Going: Summatives in the Humanities” now!
    1. Wednesday, December 3rd in Greenwood (RSVP here)
    2. Tuesday, December 9th on WebEx (RSVP here)
    3. Wednesday, December 10th in Jackson (RSVP here)
  2. Talk to Jacob, your TLD Coach, and/or your Humanities Content Leaders!
  3. Reach out to your peers!